From Sunrise to Sunset: Beneath the Underground Interns' Essays on Slave Life in Maryland
Part of the internship program at the Maryland State Archives was structured towards original research on how ex-slaves depicted their lives in Maryland before they became free. The following series of essays are the result of the interns' study.



Childhood in Slavery (Notes)
by Desiree Lee

1. Charles Ball, Slavery in the United States: A Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Charles Ball, a Black Man, Who Lived Forty Years in Maryland, South Carolina and Georgia, as a Slave, Under Various Masters, and Was One Year in The Navy With Commodore Barney, During the Late War, Containing an Account of the Manners and Treatment of the Slaves, With Observations Upon the State of Morals Amongst the Cotton Planters, and the Perils and Sufferings of a Fugitive Slave, Who Twice Escaped from the Cotton Country. (New York: John S. Taylor, 1837), 26. This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

2. Ibid., 19.

3. Ibid., 18.

4. Lucy Brooks, Interviewed by the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration in the State of Maryland, in The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography, ed. George P. Rawick, vol. 16, (Westport: Greenwood Publishing Company, 1972), vol xiii, 2.

5. James V. Deane, Interviewed by the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration in the State of Maryland, in The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography, ed. George P. Rawick, vol. 16, (Westport: Greenwood Publishing Company, 1972), vol xiii, 8.

6. Richard Mack, Interviewed by the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration in the State of Maryland, in The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography, ed. George P. Rawick, vol. 16, (Westport: Greenwood Publishing Company, 1972), vol xiii, 56; James Wiggins, Interviewed by the Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration in the State of Maryland, in The American Slave: A Composite Autobiography, ed. George P. Rawick, vol. 16, (Westport: Greenwood Publishing Company, 1972), vol xiii, 67.

7. Mathews G. Donald, Slavery and Methodism A chapter In American Morality 1780-1845 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1965), 11.

8. Lewis Charlton, Sketch of the Life of Mr. Lewis Charlton, and Reminiscences of Slavery. Ed. Edward Everett Brown. (Portland, ME: Daily Press, 1870), p. 1. http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/charlton/menu.html This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

9. Ibid.

10. Ibid., 2.

11. Ibid.

12. Leonard Black, The Life and Sufferings of Leonard Black, a Fugitive from Slavery. Written by Himself. (New Bedford: Benjamin Lindsey, 1847), 18. http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/black/menu.html This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

13. Ball, 18.

14. Ibid., 1.

15. Ibid., 18

16. Ibid.

17. Ibid., 19

18. Ibid.

19. Greensbury Washington Offley, A Narrative of the Life and Labors of the Rev. G. W. Offley, a Colored Man, Local Preacher and Missionary; Who Lived Twenty-Seven Years at the South and Twenty-Three at the North; Who Never Went to School a Day in His Life, and Only Commenced to Learn His Letters When Nineteen Years and Eight Months Old; the Emancipation of His Mother and Her Three Children; How He Learned to Read While Living in a Slave State, and Supported Himself from the Time He Was Nine Years Old Until He Was Twenty-One. (Hartford, CT: The Author, 1859), 1. http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/offley/menu.html This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

20. Ibid., 9.

21. Ibid., 10.

22. Ibid.

23. Ibid.

24. Ibid.

25. Ibid., 10.

26. Thomas Smallwood, A Narrative of Thomas Smallwood, Coloured Man: Giving an Account of His Birth--The Period He Was Held in Slavery--His Release--And Removal to Canada, etc. Together with an Account of the Underground Railroad. Written by Himself. (Toronto: The Author, 1851), 11. http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/smallwood/menu.html This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

27. William Green, Narrative of Events in the Life of William Green, (Formerly a Slave.) Written by Himself . Springfield, (MA: L. M. Guernsey, 1853), 8. http://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/greenw/menu.html This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

28. Charlton, 20.

29. Ibid., 3.

30. Offley, 7.

31. Ibid.

32. Ibid., 8-9.

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